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Leeville

A hurricane smashed into Louisiana’s coast in 1893. The village of Cheniere Caminada, located near Grand Isle, lost over 700 residents to the winds and floods of that unnamed storm. Survivors moved up Bayou Lafourche to places like Leeville, Louisiana, where they worked in the agricultural, fishing, and oil industries for much of the twentieth century.

Today, Leeville is situated outside of Louisiana’s coastal protection system. It rests in a vulnerable zone between the ring levees of Lafourche Parish in the north and the economic engines of Port Fourchon and Grand Isle in the south. If coastal erosion and subsidence projections are correct, Leeville is likely to be uninhabitable within our lifetimes. The few remaining residents of Leeville know what it’s like to live in a world suspended somewhere between open water and solid ground. They understand the human toll of environmental change. They know what it’s like to be forgotten.

 
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PODCAST

 
 
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WATER LIKE STONE

A DOCUMENTARY FILM ABOUT LEEVILLE, LOUISIANA

 

Water Like Stone is a story about the people who live in Louisiana's vanishing wetlands. Through encounters with fishermen, shrimpers and lifelong residents of Leeville, filmmakers Zack Godshall (Low and BeholdGod’s Architects) and Michael Pasquier profile the cultural consequences of environmental decay and the human spirit necessary to live in a land that is slowly washing away.

 

STORIES


Gallery

 

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